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Justice, Peace, and Integrity of Creation

A Ministry of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate

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News Archives » tar sands


DIRTY OIL: THE FILM August 31st, 2011

The first film to tackle the subject, Dirty Oil dramatically explores the battle between industry, government, local communities and environmentalists over the development of the oil sands of Alberta, Canada.

From the heart of the oil sands, the film follows the pipelines to the U.S. Midwest refineries, to witness how refineries, much like its Canadian counterparts, try to increase toxic dumpings into the Great Lakes. These disturbing stories profoundly illustrate the price dirty oil is taking on both sides of the border.

It is the heart-wrenching story of industry and government putting money before the health and security of its people and the environment.

View “Dirty Oil” online on the Babelgum website

From the makers of Downstream: Narrated by Canadian actress and environmentalist Neve Campbell, this much anticipated feature documentary from Academy Award®-Nominated director Leslie Iwerks goes deep behind-the-scenes into the strip-mined world of Northern Alberta, Canada.

 

 

 

 


Faith Groups Call on Obama to Stop Dirty Oil Sands Pipeline June 2nd, 2011

The Oblate JPIC Office has joined 45 other faith-based groups in asking the Obama Administration to deny the presidential permit needed by TransCanada Corporation to construct a pipeline to carry dirty oil sands from Alberta, Canada to Houston, TX.

The construction of such a pipeline would have devastating impacts on people living in the refining processing area as well as on the 500 miles of farmland and 1300 miles of privately-owned land that the pipeline would cross. It would also cross over the great Ogallala Aquifer, which provides roughly 30% of all the water used for irrigation on American farms. The aquifer would suffer as a result of any oil spills.

The tar-sands oil under the Boreal Forest in Canada is some of the dirtiest fuel on the planet. Once extracted and burned, tar-sands oil produces high levels of sulfur oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon monoxide.

We need to get our energy from clean sources, and not continue to look to ever more environmentally damaging and expensive sources of fossil fuels.

Read the letter on the Keystone Pipeline XL project.

 

 


Alberta Tar Sands: Dirty Oil May 9th, 2010

The recent oil-related ecological disaster in the Gulf of Mexico raises questions about the sources of the energy on which we are so dependent.  An increasingly important source of oil for the United States is the tar sands of Alberta, Canada.

The Alberta Tar sands, an extremely dense and viscous form of petroleum called bitumen, have been referred to as the most damaging project on the planet. According to Greenpeace, emissions from tar sands extraction could grow to between 127 and 140m tonnes by 2020, exceeding the current emissions of Austria, Portugal, Ireland and Denmark. If proposed expansion proceeds,it will result in the loss of vast tracts of boreal forest and peat bogs of a territory the size of England.

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The Integrity of Creation and the Athabasca Oil Sands February 9th, 2009

Luc Bouchard, Bishop of St. Paul in Alberta, Canada has issued a strong statement calling the extraction of oil from the tar sands of Alberta, Canada morally wrong and saying it is causing widespread environmental destruction. He links this extraction to the problems of human consumption of resources and wasteful life styles.

The term “tar sands”, known in the US as oil sands, refers to bitumin, a thick oil that is mixed in with sand, clay, and water. Intensive energy is required to process the sands into crude oil. Tar Sands oil is the world’s most harmful type of oil for the atmosphere, emitting high volumes of greenhouse gases during development, contributing to global warming, as well as other pollutants.

Here are some extracts from the Bishop’s Pastoral Letter, with a link to the Letter in its entirety.:

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