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Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate  United States Province

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News Archives » transparency


Oblate featured on International Business News Channel January 11th, 2016

Seamus P. FinnFr. Seamus Finn, OMI discusses a proposal that calls for a greater level of transparency and shareholder participation with Viacom…

Read the full article.

 

 

 

 

 


FACT Launches Podcast Series August 11th, 2014

New Program to Examine Issues, Promote Work of Partners

cropped-logo1Looking to more widely broadcast its message, the FACT (Financial Accountability and Corporate Transparency) Coalition, of which the Oblate JPIC Office is a member, is launching a podcast series to focus on its core issues of corporate tax avoidance, transparency in corporate ownership, and combatting money laundering.

The FACT Podcast will be released initially on a monthly basis, and more frequently as policy developments and the news of the day as events warrant.

The first podcast, Who We Are, What We Do, and Why It Matters, is available on the FACT website, provides an introduction to the FACT Coalition and the work that it does on corporate tax avoidance, more transparency in corporate ownership, and combating money laundering. Upcoming podcasts will examine these issues individually and in more detail. Later podcasts will feature interviews with subject-matter experts and highlight the work that their organizations are doing.

“This is an exciting new addition to the FACT arsenal of information on these vital issues,” said Nicole Tichon, Executive Director of FACT. “The FACT podcast provides a new way to reach even more people and that’s a good thing.”

As mentioned above, the podcast is available on the FACT website. Users can also receive it via an RSS feed.


Transparency and Reputation: There Is No Place to Hide April 8th, 2014

Father-SeamusReputation, brand and image are very important priorities for corporations, organizations and institutions. These characteristics and the products and services that they provide are closely related. Because we are now able, in most instances, to put a quantitative value on reputation, brand and image, they are considered as important to overall worth as the products and services that a corporation offers.

Welcome to the age of globalization, the worldwide web, social media and the 24/7 news cycle.

Read the blog on Huffington Post…

 

 


Diverse Coalition Calls for Transparency as the Senate Undertakes Comprehensive Tax Reform July 26th, 2013

wordle-4-transparency-camp20101The Missionary Oblates joined a diverse group of civil society organizations concerned about reports that Senate correspondence on comprehensive tax reform would be kept secret for 50 years. The groups called for greater transparency in the Senate deliberations, arguing in a letter sent to Senate Finance Committee leaders, that “transparency is essential for your final product to have credibility with the public…. Taxpayers across the United States have a right to know what their elected officials are advocating and what their justification is. We strongly urge you to reconsider this approach that smacks of backroom deals. The House Ways & Means Committee urged lawmakers and outside interests to submit their priorities and made them public. We urge a similar approach.”

Read the letter…

 


EU Parliament Adopts New Transparency Rules for Oil, Gas and Mining Companies June 13th, 2013

pwyp_foee_ft_advert_nov2012_banner_2Ahead of the G8 Summit, the European Parliament adopted new transparency rules to require oil, gas, mining and logging companies to declare corporate payments to governments in countries where they operate – much like the Dodd-Frank Act Section 1504. At the G8 summit, leaders of the wealthiest nations are to consider reporting requirements for all multinational corporate payments made to governments. This kind of “country-by-country” reporting of profits and taxes can stem corporate tax avoidance to both poor and wealthy nations.

Eric LeCompte, Executive Director of Jubilee USA Network, a faith-based antipoverty organization, released the following statement:

“Hats off to the European Union for promoting transparency and corporate accountability. Let’s hope it inspires ministers at the upcoming G8 meetings to curb corporate tax avoidance and promote transparency for all multinationals.

“The faith community believes that corporate tax avoidance constitutes a theft from the world’s poorest and most vulnerable people. When the G8 addresses this issue in Northern Ireland, they can have a real impact on global poverty.

“It’s clear that the G8 host, UK Prime Minister David Cameron, wants multinational corporate tax avoidance to be addressed. Hopefully he’ll take the energy from the EU to the G8. We’ve got to act as every year poor countries lose more to tax dodging than they receive in aid.”

Read the EU transparency rules here.


World Bank Increases Transparency June 1st, 2012

The Jubilee USA Network, of which the Missionary Oblates is a member, commends the World Bank for promoting an anti-corruption and anti-fraud position.
 

WASHINGTON, DC – The World Bank made an important move to promote transparency as they released this week’s sanctions board decisions on fraud, corruption and collusion cases. Jubilee USA commends the World Bank’s policy change to publicly disclose why they decide to sanction companies and individuals for corruption and fraud.

“This is a great move by the World Bank and everyone wins with this decision,” noted Eric LeCompte, Executive Director of Jubilee USA Network. “NGOs, businesses and governments can now better monitor patterns of fraud and corruption. Most importantly, the poor will benefit as this reporting further helps curb this behavior and ensures that resources are not stolen from the developing world.”

The sanctions board is an independent tribunal led by mainly external members and acts as the final decision-maker in all contested cases of World Bank funded projects. Historically, the World Bank only disclosed summaries of past board decisions but this new change in policy will give an in-depth review of every appeal and the logic behind deciding where misconduct occurred and what sanctions should be administered.

 

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