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Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate  United States Province

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News Archives » Ecology


Help Protect the Environment! April 12th, 2021

(Photo courtesy of Nareeta Martin,        Unsplash)

Reducing consumption, reusing items and recycling whenever possible reduces air and water pollution, keeps landfills from filling up so quickly and saves energy and money for both consumers and governments that have to deal with trash. This is a great way to deal with climate change. Our new brochure offers tips on ways you can reduce, reuse and recycle as individuals and in your communities.

Download the brochure to share online

Download the brochure to print

 

2021-JPIC-Reduce-Reuse-RecycleFinal


Webinar: “No ecology without proper anthropology” March 23rd, 2021

 
 
 
Update: If you missed the webinar you can watch a recording at this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYgcGdN15Tw  
 
Join Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate for a Zoom webinar on Saturday, March 27th at 17:00 pm Rome / CET time. (12:00 PM ET; 11:00 AM CT)    
 
Topic – ′′ There is no ecology without proper anthropology “: A reflection on chapter III of ′′ Laudato Si. ” (with simultaneous translations in French and Spanish)
 
Resource Person – Daquin Iyan Iyo, IMO (from Kenyan Mission and member of JPIC General Service, representing the Africa-Madagascar Region)
 
Everyone is welcome to participate!
 

 


Laudato Si’@ 5: Reflect, Pray & Take Action, May 16-24, 2020 May 15th, 2020

Photo courtesy of stokpic, Pixabay

Laudato Si’: On Care for Our Common Home was released at the end of May 2015. Missionary Oblates JPIC joined Catholics in welcoming Laudato Si’ and have since worked to integrate the themes into our justice and peace work. As we observe the encyclical’s five-year anniversary, we invite you to join us as we reflect on a few of the encyclical’s themes.

The ecological crisis, Pope Francis wrote, is a summons to profound interior conversion—to renew our relationships with God, one another, and the created world – The lessons of the global financial crisis have not been assimilated, and we are learning all too slowly the lessons of environmental deterioration. (#109)

Laudato Si’: Poor and Vulnerable

“The poorest areas and countries are less capable of adopting new models for reducing environmental impact because they lack the wherewithal to develop the necessary processes and to cover their costs. We must continue to be aware that, regarding climate change, there are differentiated responsibilities” (#52)

  • How does preferential option for the poor and vulnerable call us to respond to Laudato Si’? 

Laudato Si’: Global Solidarity

“Interdependence obliges us to think of one world with a common plan…A global consensus is essential for confronting the deeper problems, which cannot be resolved by unilateral actions on the part of individual countries. Such a consensus could lead, for example, to planning a sustainable and diversified agriculture, developing renewable and less polluting forms of energy, encouraging a more efficient use of energy, promoting a better management of marine and forest resources, and ensuring universal access to drinking water.” (#164)

  • How do you express solidarity with people in your community and around the world?

Laudato Si’: Common Good

“The notion of the common good also extends to future generations. The global economic crises have made painfully obvious the detrimental effects of disregarding our common destiny, which cannot exclude those who come after us. We can no longer speak of sustainable development apart from intergenerational solidarity” (#159)

  • With Whom are you called to dialogue about future of the common home? Pope Francis calls for dialogue that include everyone. Who should be included?

Find more ways here on how you can Reflect, Pray and Take Action to Celebrate the 5th anniversary of Laudato Si’. 

 


Learn about the Environmental Work of Oblates Around the World July 5th, 2017

Learn about the environmental work of Oblates around the world.




2017 World Environment Day: “Connecting People to Nature” June 1st, 2017

We are called to be instruments of God our Father, so that our planet might be what he desired when he created it and correspond with his plan for peace, beauty and fullness.”(Laudato Si, 53). 

Every June 5th people around the world celebrate World Environment Day to raise awareness about environmental issues. The UN designated this day at the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment in 1972, with the first observance taking place in 1974 and annually since then.

Today people around the world spend this day engaging in projects to improve their communities, for example neighborhood clean-ups, actions to protect wildlife, replanting trees, etc.

We also celebrate Pentecost a day before World Environment Day, on Sunday, June 4.  Given this intersection, we invite you to explore Breath of Love, a very creative and rich new prayer/reflection resource from Sr. Gen Cassani, SSND.  It includes a novena of prayers leading up to Pentecost (6/4), as well as quotes and reflections from Laudato Si’ and sacred scripture, plus ideas for commemorating World Environment Day (6/5). 

As Sr. Gen has written, “you are invited to add to, create, have conversations, mull over, contemplate, delight in, question, probe, . . . ” – we simply say enjoy!

Click to download Breath of Love, a  Pentecost and Environment resource compiled and designed by Sr. Gen Cassani, SSND.

 


Oblates Give Miners A Voice March 23rd, 2017

(Originally published on OMIUSA.org)

By Mike Viola

The Missionary Oblates are expanding their role as advocates for the rights of miners around the world.

Father Seamus Finn, O.M.I. of the U.S. Oblates’ Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation Office, participated in a day of reflection on the mining industry sponsored by the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace.

Mining CEOs, representatives of the Pontifical Council and religious congregations from around the world examined ways mining companies can improve their record on human and environmental responsibilities while also achieving their business objectives.

Father Finn said the day of reflection showed mining executives that their success should not be judged only in monetary terms, but also by the impact their companies are having on the lives of people.

Fr. Séamus Finn, OMI

“I now understand better the meaning of a people-directed engagement approach,” said David Noko, Vice President of Sustainability for AngloGold Ashanti, one of the world’s largest gold mining companies.  “I am more empowered to include in my business strategy a new way of engagement founded on solid principles of social good and environmental sustainability.”

Father Finn also attended a dialogue in Lima, Peru on the impact of mining in local communities in Latin America.  He is helping to develop strategies and networks to address the destructive impacts of mining. “Extractives, mining oil and gas exploration play an important role across the world while also imposing great disruption and damage in local communities and on the environment,” said Fr. Finn.  “The search for a way forward that addresses the most serious of these negative impacts has been taken up by a number of different initiatives.”

Father Gilbeto Pauwels, O.M.I. Director of the Center of Ecology and Andean People in Oruro, Bolivia knows firsthand the devastating effects mining can have on communities.  The Oblates in Bolivia have been fighting against this injustice for more than 50 years.

Miners in Bolivia

In 1960 the Oblates started Radio Pio XII to broadcast support for Bolivian tin miners.  The station still broadcasts today despite strong opposition to its message.

Father Roberto Durette, O.M.I. has been the Director of Radio Pio XII for nearly 40 years.  Despite having survived several assassination attempts, Fr. Roberto is undeterred in his passionate fight for the rights of the miners.

Father Finn said the day of reflection deepened his awareness of the need to advocate on behalf of miners.  “The roundtable at the Vatican was not just a one-time event,” he said.  “This is an ongoing project.”

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