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Oblates Daily Prayer July 12th, 2024

Every day the Oblate Community and Family in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales publish a short reflective morning prayer video, created by members. Please join in daily from where you are.



Visit their Youtube channel for more videos: https://www.youtube.com/@TheOblates 


Missionary Oblates: Central Government & Canada-US Region Hold Joint Session, July 8-13, 2024 July 11th, 2024

(Republished from OMIWORLD)

Day 3 – Wednesday, July 10

On this anniversary of the death of Br. Anthony Kowalczyk, OMI, participants in the CROCUS Joint Session, were reminded of his exemplary religious life. His humble and dedicated zeal for service to others, particularly the youth, and his intense search for God were central themes. The Canada-US leadership strives to emulate this same devotion to mission and service to the poor as they discern the future path of Oblate missionaries.

Where do we want to go? How will we get there?

These two questions guided the day’s discussions, primarily in small groups. Three key priorities emerged repeatedly: fostering a life-giving community, living out the vows (CCRR), and caring for each other.

Fr. Charles Rensburg took to the podium to present the results of an extensive OMI demographic analysis. He discussed the financial implications of demographic changes within the Oblate Congregation over the next eight to ten years and how these shifts might influence decision-making as the Congregation moves forward in this synodal process toward renewal.

With all this information in mind, participants walked to the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, a few blocks away. There, they celebrated the Eucharist in the Oblate Chapel, with CROCUS President Fr. Ken Thorson presiding.


Video: United in Mission: The Evolution and Impact of the Congregation’s Joint Sessions July 10th, 2024

(Republished from OMIUSA.ORG)

The Central Government members are visiting the Oblates and charismatic family members in the Canada–United States Region in preparation for the Joint Session in Washington DC from July 7th to 13th. Have you ever wondered about the history of these sessions and their impact on the congregation?

The Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI) have a rich history of evangelization and closeness to the poor. The Joint Sessions are critical to this mission, providing a platform for collaboration, reflection, and strategic planning.

St. Eugene de Mazenod, our founder, emphasized unity, collective discernment, and mutual support among Oblates to effectively serve the poor and the Church. This laid the foundation for Joint Sessions. Initially, these were informal gatherings to discuss issues, share experiences, and find solutions.

As the importance of these meetings grew, they became formalized. By the mid-20th century, Joint Sessions were regular events on the Congregation’s calendar, reflecting a commitment to ongoing formation, collaboration, and spiritual growth to enhance the Congregation’s mission worldwide.

The main goal of the Joint Sessions is to foster unity and collaboration among regional members and the central government. These sessions encourage open communication, building trust, and mutual support. They also provide a forum to discuss and address challenges the Congregation faces in specific regions.

Joint Sessions include plenary sessions, workshops, group discussions, and spiritual reflections. This comprehensive approach addresses both practical and spiritual aspects of missionary work, reinforcing the Congregation’s identity and mission to evangelize the poor and marginalized.

 


Reflection on June’s Laudato Si Field Trip With OMI Novices July 8th, 2024

By Sr. Maxine Pohlman, SSND

One of the important themes running throughout the encyclical is interconnectedness. In paragraph 92 we read, “We can hardly consider ourselves to be fully loving if we disregard any aspect of reality: ‘Peace, justice and the preservation of creation are three absolutely interconnected themes, which cannot be separated and treated individually without once again falling into reductionism. ‘”

In order to explore this theme, it seemed fitting to have a virtual visit with Seamus Finn, OMI, who has been Director of the Office of Justice, Peace, and the Integrity of Creation (JPIC) for the U.S. Province for many years.

During our conversation with him, Father Seamus connected us with Oblate history that gave flesh to the JPIC Office and its many years of ministry for the US Province. He showed us how the Office works on the level where laws are made in order not only to shed the light of the Gospel on world issues, but also to have an impact!

We learned that in 1992 the phrase integrity of creation was first used in the Oblate world along with the idea of ecological vocation and the encouragement to care for the environment. From that time onward, the integrity of creation became part of OMI missionary life and ministry.

Father Seamus’ broad-ranging knowledge of finance, justice, and ecology, along with his experience of visiting many countries around the world where OMI ministers, opened our eyes to the importance of sharing oneself on many levels, networking both locally and globally.

We felt grateful to have met this Oblate who has had a positive impact on our world!


Video: Celebrate National Pollinator Week: June 17-23 June 19th, 2024

Join us in celebrating National Pollinator Week 2024 at La Vista Ecological Learning Center and everywhere! Pollinator Week is a celebration of the vital role that pollinators play in our ecosystems, economies, and agriculture.

Benefits of Native Pollinator Gardens

01 – Offset threats to the monarch butterfly migration​
02 – Assure pollinators a diverse food source throughout the season​
03 – Provide herbicide-free nectar for a variety of pollinators.

Pollinators are responsible for every third bite of food we eat, and because their disappearance creates a hole in the ecosystem, we consider this effort important in contributing to the integrity of creation.

 

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