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Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate  United States Province

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Pope Francis in Canada: Walking Together August 3rd, 2022

Healing and Reconciliation: An Historic Journey

Pope Francis made a pastoral visit to Canada from July 24 to 29, 2022. The Pope’s visit provided a unique opportunity for him, once again, to listen and dialogue with Indigenous Peoples, to express his heartfelt closeness and to address the impact of colonization and the participation of the Catholic Church in the operation of residential schools throughout Canada. The papal visit also provided an opportunity for the shepherd of the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics to connect with the Catholic community in Canada.

Pope Francis Visits Sacred Heart Church of the First Peoples

The Catholic Church has a responsibility to take genuine and meaningful steps to journey with Indigenous Peoples of this land on the lengthy path to healing and reconciliation.  Visit this site for articles, videos and speeches on the historic journey of Pope Francis to Canada, a significant step on the road to truth, understanding and healing. 

Fr. Susai Jesu, OMI, pastor, welcomes Pope Francis to Sacred Heart Church of the First Peoples in Edmonton, AB (photo via @VaticanNews broadcast)

Fr. Nnaemeka Ali, OMI, a Nigerian priest working with the Innu First Nations in Canada, upholds the papal visit as an opportunity for reconciliation, and says the Church needs to listen to and work with indigenous communities. Read the article.

This site –https://www.papalvisit.ca/– provides information on the historic journey of Pope Francis to Canada, a significant step on the road to truth, understanding and healing.

 


DOWA Metals & Mining is a threat to the Chilkat Watershed April 16th, 2021

Photo courtesy of Timothy Eberly, Unsplash

TAKE ACTION: HELP US STOP THIS MINE!

The Chilkat River—“Jilkaat Heeni” in the Tlingit language, meaning “storage container for salmon”—runs from its headwaters in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia, Canada, into the sea near Haines, Alaska.

The watershed was settled millennia ago and is the traditional territory of the Chilkat Tlingit people. Today, the watershed remains central, economically and culturally, to the Chilkat Indian Village of Klukwan, a federally recognized tribe. Traditional harvests, particularly of wild salmon and eulachon, are the lifeblood of the Village.

Japanese smelter company DOWA Metals and Mining has taken control of the Palmer Mine Project at the headwaters of the Chilkat Watershed. Send this letter DOWA, asking the Board of Directors to stop funding this mine. 
 
Visit this website to read more & send the letter.
 

 


Canadian Symposium on Mining and Justice in November October 24th, 2014

The Oblate JPIC initiative in Canada has organized a symposium on mining, called “The Global Cry of the People” Symposium on Mining Extraction and Justice for Friday, November 7th and Saturday November 8th, 2014. It will be held at Saint Paul’s University in Ottawa.

The symposium is designed to create a greater awareness among Canadians about the impact of mining, and will try to create a space for Church, civil society and politicians to learn and discuss the justice issues involved.

Partners in this project include: St Paul University, Canadian Mining Watch, the Canadian Catholic Organization for Development and Peace, the Halifax Initiative, Citizens for Public justice, Canadian Martyrs Parish, St Joseph’s Parish, Episcopal Commission for Justice and Peace-CCCB and KAIROS. The guest speaker will be the theologian Fr. Gustavo Gutierrez Merino, well-known as the founder of liberation theology in Latin America. The symposium will also feature presentations from experts, which will include Canadian politicians, representatives of the mining industry, and spokespersons with direct experience from mining communities in Asia, Africa, Latin America and Canada.

Information and the registration form, are now available by going to the OMI Lacombe website and selecting Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation/JPIC. There you will find all conference materials. You can also register here.

This symposium is free and open to all who might be interested, although a voluntary donation to cover costs will be accepted at the registration table.

For more information, please contact Leonardo Rego, OMI at jpic@omilacombe.ca

 

 

 


Canada Declares Support for Human Right to Water May 31st, 2012

In a surprising turnaround, Canada bowed to years of national and international pressure, deciding at last to recognize the human right to water and sanitation.

The Council of Canadians, Canada’s largest social justice advocacy organization, has campaigned for more than a decade to ensure the human right to water, and posted this response to the announcement on their website:

As recently as last month, Canada was isolated in the Rio+20 negotiations as the only country to publicly claim there is no legal basis for the right and call for its deletion. This position was untenable, however, almost two years after the United Nations General Assembly passed a resolution recognizing the right (GA Res. A/64/292) followed by three subsequent confirming Human Rights Council resolutions.

Maude Barlow, National Chairperson of the Council of Canadians and a former UN Senior Advisor on Water to the President of the General Assembly, says, “It took unprecedented pressure to get this government to change its position, and the shift is a good thing, but words are not enough. We need actions, and the government’s actions directly contradict respect for the human right to water.”

The Council has consistently asked Canadian governments to show their commitment to water by implementing a national water act including a domestic plan of action on the human right to water. The Council of Canadians looks forward to the government providing a clear plan of what it intends to do to meet its international and domestic obligations with regard to the human right to water and sanitation.

 Learn more…


Canada Endorses UN Indigenous Rights Declaration November 17th, 2010

The Government of Canada formally endorsed the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples on November 12.

“We understand and respect the importance of this United Nations Declaration to Indigenous peoples in Canada and worldwide,” said the Honourable John Duncan, Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-status Indians. “Canada has endorsed the Declaration to further reconcile and strengthen our relationship with Aboriginal peoples in Canada.”

Learn more…


Mentoring Students in Social Justice Work November 1st, 2010

Fr. Daniel Renaud, omi is interested in developing a program for students to learn about social justice work by engaging with people at the grassroots or through issue advocacy. If you are an Oblate involved in social justice work, he would like to connect with you to discuss the possibility of a student coming to work with you for a period of time.

Father Renaud is Chaplain at St. Paul University in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. He has recently been named chair of the Canadian Catholic Campus Ministry Association. This association, mandated by the Conference of Canadian Bishops, supports campus ministry in promoting the mission of the Catholic Church.

Fr. Daniel Renaud has been the Chaplain at Saint Paul University since 2004. His email is: drenaud@ustpaul.ca The University website is www.ustpaul.ca

Fr. Renaud explains his idea in this interview with the Oblate US JPIC Office Watch the video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYTsmnvWUUg
(Watch the video on YouTube)

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