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Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate  United States Province

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2019 Year in Review: A Year of Engagement, Outreach and Action January 3rd, 2020

Photo courtesy of Glen Carrie, Unsplash


Happy New Year. Here are some 2019 highlights from the OMI JPIC office:

o   January 2019, JPIC started the year on a somber note and in solidarity with OMI Province of the Philippines on the Jolo Cathedral Bombing in January 2019.

o   February 2019 Fr. Séamus Finn, OMI and Fr Rufus Whitley, OMI presented at the Vatican Conference in Rome on Impact Investing: Scaling Investment in Service of Integral Human Development which focused on concrete ways that capital can help the poor around the world.

o   March 2019, JPIC office welcomed and hosted Fr. Ray Cook OMI and Rice University Students

o   April 2019, the OMI JPIC Committee met in New Orleans, Louisiana at the historic St Augustine Catholic Church.

o   May 2019,  JPIC welcomed Br. Joey Methé, OMI for 2019 Summer Intern. And expressed gratitude for the vocation of Fr. Seamus Finn, OMI on 43 Years of Priesthood

June 2019, Missionary Oblates joined Global Investors in Urging G20 Governments to Address Climate Change

o   Effective July 1, 2019, Mrs. Mary O’ Herron and Fr Emmanuel Mulenga OMI appointed to a three-year term on the  JPIC committee.

o   August 2019, launch of the new 360° design for JPIC newsletter:http://omiusajpic.org/2019/08/16/presenting-our-2019-summer-jpic-report-with-a-fresh-new-look/

o   US Provincial Fr Louis Studer, OMI joined national leaders in sign-on letter urging the administration to pass bipartisan budget agreement that lifted spending caps for non-defense programs and raises debt ceiling.

o   In September 2019, to mark World Day of Migrants and Refugees JPIC launched the podcast featuring Fr. Jesse Esqueda OMI speaking on the migrant crisis in Tijuana.

o   October 2019, JPIC social media provided a platform for Oblates updates and happenings at Pan-Amazon Region in Rome and experiences of Oblates at the Amazon Synod such as Fr Roberto Carrasco, OMI 

o   November 2019, Fr Séamus Finn, OMI, was the keynote speaker at Marquette’s first symposium on Socially Responsible Investing where he explored the history of socially responsible investing, drawing on personal stories and work as board chair of the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility

o   In December 2019Missionary Oblates joined 80 national religious bodies in sending letter the US Senate urging passage of the ILLICIT CASH Act (S.2563) and the Corporate Transparency Act (S.1978)

o   December 2019, another big highlight was a Congressional Hearing on the state of migrant children where JPIC Committee member Patti Radle was among panelists giving powerful testimonies: https://edlabor.house.gov/hearings/growing-up-in-fear-how-the-trump-administrations-immigration-policies-are-harming-children-

 


Climate Change: ICCR Members Review Past Work and Plan for 2018-19 Corporate Engagement Season July 18th, 2018

By Frank Sherman

The ICCR Climate Change Workgroup met in mid-June, hosted by the Nathan Cummings Foundation, an ICCR member in NYC, to evaluate the progress over the past year and chart out a path forward for the 2018-19 corporate engagement season. We took time to reflect on the social and faith trends; review the political and economic landscape; and map the growing investor actions on climate. We then evaluated our progress over the past couple years before developing a SWOT analysis, mission and vision. In the afternoon, we discussed the path forward by re-directing the existing programs and discussing some new areas to pursue.

Jake Barnett (Morgan Stanley Graystone), together with Mary Beth Gallagher (Tri-State CRI), presented the climate justice perspective by describing the disproportionate adverse impacts climate change has on vulnerable communities. These include decreased agricultural production due to drought resulting in increased migration, disproportionate impacts on women, increased disease burdens due to intensified heat and insect-borne diseases, and displacement from intensified storms due to lack of resilience (e.g. Hurricane Harvey and Maria). In addition, roughly 1.1 billion people lack access to electricity, making the provision of clean, affordable energy essential for communities trying to escape poverty. Unlike secular asset managers, the faith community can elevate climate change from a partisan political discourse to a moral issue that we are all called to address. We need to be bold and exhibit urgency by leveraging partner organizations (Human Rights Watch, Earth Justice, Sierra Club, etc.), and put a human face on the climate change impacts.

Aaron Ziulkowski (Walden Asset) provided the political and economic overview noting that, despite growing awareness, global GHG emissions continue to rise, although they have leveled off in OECD (developed) countries. The national commitments made in Paris fall short of the 2 degree scenario and get the world nowhere near the 1.5 degree ambition. Transportation has replaced electricity production as the top emitter in the U.S. due to the displacement of coal by natural gas. Despite the White House announced withdraw from Paris, several states have set targets for GHG reduction, renewable energy and CAFÉ standards (which reduce auto emissions) that exceed federal standards. Japan, the EU, China and India continue to increase CAFÉ standards while Trump’s EPA rolls back U.S. targets. The EPA is being sued for rolling back methane emissions standards in oil & gas production. Economists are confident that economics wins over politics with the cost of unsubsidized wind and solar electrical power now competitive with fossil fuels. We agreed to step up public advocacy and pressure corporations to do the same if the U.S. wants to remain competitive in a low carbon world.

Read the rest of the article on Seventh Generation’s website.

 


Leading Oil and Gas Executives Attend Climate Change Conference Hosted by Vatican June 12th, 2018

On Friday, June 8, leading oil and gas executives attended a climate change conference hosted by the Vatican titled, “Energy Transition and Care for Our Common Home” and held at the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.

The conference is follow-up to Pope Francis’ encyclical, Laudato Si: On Care for our Common Home, which was released three years ago on June 18.

Visit this website to read Pope Francis’ address to meeting participants

Visit these links to read more about the conference:

CAFOD
https://cafod.org.uk/News/Campaigning-news/Pope-fossil-fuels-energy-call

The Guardian
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jun/09/pope-francis-tells-oil-bosses-world-must-wean-itself-off-fossil-fuels 

 


The Cry of the Earth is the Cry of the Poor: the New Faces of Poverty August 4th, 2017


*Event will be streamed live on St. Paul University’s website. Stay tuned for more information.


The Justice, Peace and the Integrity of Creation (JPIC) offices of OMI USA and OMI Lacombe Canada are pleased to invite you to attend a Symposium entitled “The Cry of the Earth is the Cry of the Poor, the New Faces of Poverty.

This event will be held on Wednesday, August 30th, 2017 from 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m:

St Paul University
223 Main St.
Laframboise building Rm 120
Ottawa, CANADA

It will be an opportunity to engage in the work of the Church and the Oblate order to tackle poverty and fight for social justice and environmental protection.

The day will include panel discussions entitled:

  • Oblates are called today to embrace the new faces of the poor
  •  “Evangelii Gaudium” and “Laudato Si” as a true ecological and social approach to the new faces of poverty
  • Responses to the demands of the new faces of the poor  from the spirituality of “Laudato Si”

The presentations will highlight the relationships between poverty, ecology and climate change, the quality of the social condition and the responsibility and role of the church and other religious groups in promoting social justice.

There will be formal opportunities for questions and discussion.It would be an honor for us, if you could join us for this important event.

Note: There is no cost to attend this event; however donations will be accepted. Parking is limited and available at $10 for the day and lunch will be provided.

DOWNLOAD THE PROGRAM SCHEDULE HERE

 Visit St. Paul University’s website.


Missionary Oblates Oppose U.S. Withdrawal from Paris Climate Agreement June 6th, 2017

“Climate change is a global problem with grave implications: environmental, social, economic, political and for the distribution of goods.”
Pope Francis, Laudato Sí: On Care of our Common Home


Missionary Oblates JPIC is deeply concerned about the impacts of environmental degradation on God’s creation.  The decision by the Trump Administration to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, which was ratified by 195 countries including the United States is a disappointment. We join other faith leaders and communities to urge the Administration to reconsider this decision and propose concrete ways to address global climate change and promote environmental stewardship. As people of faith who value the care for creation, we believe that impacts of climate change will directly impact all communities, both in the United States and around the world, especially poor and abandoned people whom Oblates minister to each day. Visit the links below to read more on the issue.


2016 Lenten Reflection on Climate Change February 12th, 2016

Lent2016banner

 

Our faith calls us to pray, fast, and give to charity during Lent. As we look inward and spiritually reflect on our own lives, let us also remember our struggling brothers and sisters around the world and even people right in our backyards. To help support your Lenten devotion, Missionary Oblates JPIC is pleased to offer weekly resources centered on a justice theme.

WEEK III — The environment/climate change is this week’s focus. 2015 was the year for global action on the environment with several significant happenings, including the release of Pope Francis’ encyclical Laudato Si: On Care for our Common Home, and huge rallies for the environment held around the world.  Download the resource here.

lWEEK II — This second week we focus on the global occurrence of modern day slavery, also known as human trafficking. An estimated 30 million people worldwide are trafficked at any given time. Please feel free to share this resource with your congregations, communities and use during your prayer time. Download the resource here.

WEEK I — This week’s focus is migration, a pressing global issue that affects us all. Please feel free to share this resource with your congregations, communities and use during your  prayer time. Download the resource here.

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