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Justice, Peace, and Integrity of Creation

A Ministry of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate

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Safe Drinking Water Treatment Guides Available

December 11th, 2009

No_drinking_waterAre you living in or planning to be working in an area without safe, clean drinking water? These fact sheets from the US Agency for International Development (USAID) contain useful information on how to filter, treat and store drinking water to maintain a safe supply.

  • Boiling: Household Water Treatment Options in Developing Countries. January 2009. CDC Safewater/USAID. (Download pdf, 538KB).

Boiling is arguably the oldest and most commonly practiced household water treatment method, and it has been widely promoted for decades. Organizations recommend boiling both for water treatment in developing countries and to provide safe drinking water in emergency situations throughout the world.

  • Filtration & Chlorination Systems: Household Water Treatment Options in Developing Countries. January 2009. CDC Safewater/USAID. (Download pdf, 150KB).

Several household water treatment systems incorporate both a physical filtration step for particle removal and a chlorination step for
disinfection. This dual approach leads to high quality treated water.

  • Safe Storage of Drinking Water: Preventing Diarrheal Disease in Developing Countries. January 2009. CDC Safewater/USAID. (Download pdf, 254KB).

Safe storage options fall into three general categories: 1) existing water storage containers in the home; 2) water storage containers used in the community and modified by an intervention program; or, 3) commercial safe storage containers purchased by the program and distributed to users.

  • Simple Options to Remove Turbidity: Preventing Diarrheal Disease in Developing Countries. January 2009. CDC Safewater/USAID. (Download pdf, 173KB).

Filtration or flocculation removes particles and reduces turbidity. These pretreatment methods may also increase the efficacy of household water treatment products by removing contaminants that interfere with disinfection and physical filtration processes.

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